Writing a Samba VFS Module

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Revision as of 19:34, 28 February 2015 by Realrichardsharpe (talk | contribs) (The Samba VFS Layer)

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Introduction

Since there have been significant changes between Samba 3.x (and earlier) and Samba 4.0 and above, I thought I would start a new document on this topic rather than trying to overload the earlier document with more complex versions specific differences. A lot of content was copied from the previous version of the document with the permission of its author.

The remaining sections deal with:

  1. The Samba VFS Layer contains a discussion of the VFS Layer.
  2. Building your VFS module contains a discussion of how to get your module build.
  3. Etc.

The Samba VFS Layer

The Samba VFS provides a mechanism to allow people to extend the functionality of Samba in useful ways. Some examples are:

  1. Convert NTFS ACLs to NFSv4 ACLs for storing in a file system that supports them. The GPFS VFS module does this and the same could be done for Linux when RichACL support is complete.
  2. Support features that a vendor has implemented in their file system that Linux file systems do not support. # The OneFS VFS module from Isilon interfaces with their in-kernel distributed file system which provides more complete NTFS functionality, including four file times, etc.
  3. Implement features like Alternate Data Streams.
  4. Implement full NT ACL support by storing them in XATTRs and correctly handling the semantics (see source3/modules/vfs_acl_xattr.c and source3/modules/vfs_acl_common.c.)
  5. Support user-space file systems, perhaps accessible via a shared memory interface or via a user-space library (eg, Ceph's libceph.) Modules that do this are vfs_ceph.c and vfs_glusterfs.c
  6. A Samba VFS is a shared library (eg, acl_xattr.so), or module, that implements some or all of the functions that the Samba VFS interface makes available to provides the desired functionality. In addition VFS modules can be stacked (if they have been written for that), and there is a default VFS (source3/modules/vfs_default.c) that provides the default Samba functionality for those functions that are not implemented higher in the stack or that earlier modules also call.

The following diagrams help illustrate some of the concepts in more detail. Samba-vfs-diag-1.gif

The things to note here are:

  1. There are a number of layers to Samba.
  2. Protocol processing code in Samba will usually call one or more VFS Functions.
  3. Your specific Samba configuration can use a number of VFS modules that do not have to overlap. That is, they can each implement different sets of VFS functions (of which, more below). However, they can also be stacked.
  4. There is a default VFS module (which is statically linked into Samba) that provides implementations of all VFS functions and functions as a backstop. That is, it will be called in the event that no other module implements a particular function or will be called last if the functions in your module pass control down the stack.
  5. The default VFS module, vfs_defaults.c (source3/modules/vfs_defaults.c) calls back into Samba, usually via the sys_xxx routines, but sometimes it calls other modules.

If you want to find out what a particular VFS function does in general you should check the code in vfs_defaults.c. If you want to find out what an existing VFS module check its code in source3/modules.

The above figure also illustrates the flow of control through Samba and the VFS modules. The steps are similar to the following:

  1. An SMB request comes into Samba (steps 1 or 11), which results in Samba calling VFS routines. The call is via a macro in the source code that looks like SMB_VFS_XXX, eg, SMB_VFS_STAT to retrieve file metadata.
  2. The VFS layer calls the entry point in the first VFS module in the stack that implements the requested function. In the figure above, Req 1 results in a call to an entry point (step 2) in vfs_mod_1.so while Req 2 results in a call to an entry point (step 12) in vfs_mod_2.so.
  3. If the called function needs the functionality provided by other modules in the stack, it calls VFS_SMB_NEXT_XXX, which in the illustration ends up in the default VFS module, vfs_default.c. That is, the VFS function called in vfs_mod_1.so in step 2 above then results in a call to the NEXT function (step 3) and ends up in vfs_default.c
  4. The entry points in the default VFS module typically call functions in the system layer, eg, sys_stat (step 4).
  5. The system module calls into the kernel via a system call, eg, the stat system call (step 5).
  6. The system call returns to the system module (step 6), which
  7. Returns to the function in vfs_default.c that called the system layer (step 7), which
  8. Returns up the stack to the VFS module (step 8), which
  9. Returns to the main Samba code (step 9), which
  10. Formats and sends an SMB response (step 10).

Building Your VFS Module

To be continued.